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sifat
Feb 16, 2022
In Yoga Forum
One of the biggest problems facing the digital marketing industry is that it changes so quickly. With change comes understandable confusion, especially if you aren't in the industry. Confusion about what works and what doesn't. Different people say different things. SEO is dead. Email is dead. How are companies and small businesses supposed to know what tactics to use and who to trust? The truth is it's a difficult task, because the real answer is 'it depends.' SEO might not serve your businesses goals, but it will work wonders for other companies. The willingness to react, pivot and shift strategies is the real key to digital success. With that said, email marketing is certainly not dead. Which is why, in this entry to the WSI DM Video Series, we've lined up 5 tips to achieving email marketing excellence. Check them out! 1. Make It Simple To Subscribe You hear it all the time in digital marketing: make it simple. And sometimes, it really is as easy as making it simple. You want people to share your stuff? Make it dead simple. You want a high quality email list that wants to hear what you have to say? Make it easy Photo Editing Services and inviting to subscribe. The better you target your message and build your list, the more success you'll achieve when you engage via email. 2. Use Creative Subject Lines When people give you permission to email them, it's because they assume you've got something interesting to say. They think you're smart, funny and have relevant information. Don't let them down. Being creative with your headlines is a great way to affirm your customers' decisions to let you contact them. Right off the bat, they'll think, "See, I knew these guys were smart." It sounds trivial, but the headline of that first email you send a new subscriber could be the defining moment of your email engagement with them. If the headline is good, they might always read your stuff; if it's not, they might unsubscribe. Get your headline writing hat on! 3. Give Subscribers What They Want When it comes to email, the customer experience matters. If people subscribe to your list expecting to be emailed once a month but you contact them once a week, they aren't going to be happy. Give your subscribers what they want (and expect). Additionally, you can build an opt-in list and segment subscribers into groups - this way, you can deliver more enhanced messages and get a little bit more personal and creative. 4. Use Graphics Wisely There's no doubt that the Internet is becoming an increasingly visual place, but that doesn't mean all images are created equal. What works on a website might not work in an email. Lean on experts to create specific templates and visuals for email to ensure a reinforcement of your brand without making glaring technical mistakes. 5. Respect A Subscriber's Choice If you're doing things correctly, your subscribers had a choice when they signed up. They should retain that choice throughout their subscription, which means they should be able to easily unsubscribe whenever they choose. Don't remove their choice or make it extremely difficult to properly unsubscribe. Making an unsubscribe button that is clear and obvious should actually build trust among your subscribers, because it means you respect them.
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sifat
Feb 16, 2022
In Yoga Forum
With Christmas just around the corner, the holiday tunes are in full swing and the escapades of Clark Griswold and Kevin McCallister are endlessly replaying on our TVs. So let's get serious for a second and ask ourselves, as we do every year at this time, "Have I been naughty or nice?" As the tradition goes, if you're on Santa's nice list, you'll get a fun Christmas present that rewards your good behaviour; if you're on the naughty list, you'll get a lump of coal that represents your mischievous year. The important thing from everybody to remember is that not only does Santa Claus always make his list - he checks it twice. Santa Tracks and Measures - You Should Too So what do Santa and Christmas have to do with your business? For starters, the big guy in the red suit can teach you that tracking and measuring is important, no matter what goal you're trying to accomplish. With Santa, it's determining whether a person falls into Category A or Category B, which is a pretty simple goal (and probably not all that hard to track if you Philippines Photo Editor picture a digital-savvy North Pole a la Arthur Christmas instead of what's depicted in Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer). But the fact remains that Santa's whole operation revolves around tracking and measuring something - if it didn't, how would he know how many presents he needed? How would he know when to start making toys so the elves could meet their deadline of Christmas Eve? The short answer is that he wouldn't, and the North Pole - and Christmas - would be a mess. Businesses and people often put themselves through a similar chaos by not setting goals and tracking and measure their level of achievement. Whether it's your digital marketing campaigns, weight loss or monthly entertainment spending money, you're not going to have very much success unless you set a target or a goal - and then that target or goal is completely useless unless you track your results. If you're unfamiliar with the world of web analytics, you might be intimidated by the thought of measurement and the idea of complex tools, charts and graphs that go with it. But the truth is that it really can (and should, especially at first) be as simple as Santa's naughty or nice list. Whether it's more visitors per day, a lower bounce rate or a higher amount of time spent viewing each page, a simple metric can provide you with an attainable goal that will get you started with web analytics. Learn By Doing, But Keep It Simple When I say simple, I mean really simple. You need only two things: a website being tracked by Google Analytics and a target or goal. It can be a goal centered on a really basic metric, like number of daily visitors. These examples are more for the process of measuring and using analytics as information and knowledge rather than the metric you're actually tracking. Here are a few generic examples and a summary of how these simple targets and measurements can provide valuable insight: Weekend Woes This is a snapshot of wsiworld.com's visits (per day) from September to December. One thing is immediately obvious: about every 5 days, there's a significant dip in the number of visitors our site receives. If you haven't already guessed, those two day dips are the weekends. For a business that operates Monday-Friday, this isn't unexpected. However, it's not like the site is receiving zero visitors on Saturdays and Sundays - it's getting roughly half the number of visits than the preceding week. This means that there's an opportunity for us to generate more traffic on weekends, should we decide that's an important initiative. And the reason we're aware of this opportunity? Because we're tracking and measuring our website's traffic! So, let's say we decided that publishing and distributing one blog post per weekend was a good way to generate more traffic on Saturdays and Sundays. We'd then set a goal - let's say a 25% increase of weekend traffic - and keep an eye on the numbers to see how we're doing. It can be that simple. More Content = More Traffic This is a six-month snapshot of a newly launched, content driven website. As you can see, this site receives much less traffic - which makes sense, since it's not really a business. The big takeaway for this website though, is that every time you see a spike in their traffic, it directly corresponds to the publication of a new piece of content. Essentially, when they publish content, it gets read for a few days by almost 100% more traffic than on a normal day with no new content. Obviously, this website is not publishing very much content - about 27 articles in five months - but if they ever decided to ramp it up, something like 50 visitors per day would be attainable in the short term with more content.
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